Posts Tagged ‘tax planning’

Why Dividend-Paying Stocks Are So Popular Now

  Not only are the economy and financial markets sending mixed signals, now the Fed is too. Up until recently, the Federal Open Market Committee of the Federal Reserve Board had been unanimous in its efforts to either hold steady or slowly increase interest rates based on labor market conditions and inflation factors. However, at…

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Home Sweet Home

  Like other aspects of the economy, the real estate market has been slow to recover to “normal” levels. But we believe there are some positives that come with the lull in housing sales. In some pockets of the country, prices have escalated substantially due to low inventory, high demand and relatively low interest rates.…

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More Retirees Heading for Hubs

When retirement is on the horizon, many people put their current hometown in the rearview mirror. As the retiree population continues its upward trajectory, we expect popular retirement destinations to grow right along with it. A recent study by McKinsey & Company identified 13 U.S. “retirement hubs” — cities that are most likely to experience…

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The Media that Cried “Crisis”

The word “crisis” has become quite popular in our 24-hour news cycle. It’s a word media outlets have attached to everything from student loans to weight gain to a national shortage of biscuits in an attempt to maximize the eyeballs on their content. [CLICK HERE to read the article, “The Great British Biscuit Crisis is…

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Financial Markets and Presidential Elections

  There’s a saying that with enough prodding, you can make statistics say whatever you want. We believe this is especially true for the loads of data surrounding presidential elections. It’s possible to use the data to say two different things about the economy, depending on the point you’re trying to make. For example, one…

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The Art of Intelligence Open to Interpretation

  Albert Einstein once said, “The true sign of intelligence is not knowledge, but imagination.” People may have different views on that point. Would someone with an MBA from Harvard be considered more intelligent than a painter with an art degree? Certainly, it’s an open discussion. Regardless of who attends college or what profession they…

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The Value of Optimism

Anyone approaching the end of their working years can likely list more than a few occurrences in which they’ve experienced a stressful moment or handled a hectic ordeal. Although retiring may end the need to put out fires in the workplace, stress built up over the years does take its toll and, for some, may…

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Watching the Markets with Interest

  In March, the Federal Reserve decided to reign in its plan for raising rates this year, reducing the expected number of rate increases from four to two. The Federal Open Market Committee came away from its most recent meeting projecting an interest rate hike of .50 percent, down from the original projection of 1…

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The Complexity of Convenience

 Forty years ago, you couldn’t grocery shop on Sundays. In fact, you couldn’t really do much shopping on Sundays at all. This tradition was rooted in the religious doctrine that on Sundays, we rest. Some stores still observe the Sabbath, but most indulge the habits and demands of consumerism. Not to mention higher revenues. It…

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All Work, No Play Makes for a Long Day

  One of the great things about the United States is that your level of success is largely in your hands. Hard work and the right decisions can go a long way in ensuring your prosperity. However, when chasing the American dream, some forget that it’s important to maintain happiness along the way. Many workers…

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